PMS Tea

PMS herbs have been identified for hundreds of years, and long before drug stores and pharmacies, herbs were the only choice that women suffering from pre-menstrual symptoms had. Teas are effective to relieve, cramps,  tender breasts, insomnia, depression, hot flashes, bloating and weight gain.

PMS Tea promotes a healthy pre-menstrual cycle by temporarily reducing water retention. Teas can be made with herbs traditionally used to eliminate excess fluid by supporting kidney function,which is responsible for maintaining fluid and electrolyte balance in the body. It also supports liver function which breaks down excess estrogen, a factor in cycle-related water retention.

Herbal Teas for PMS

  • St. Johns Wort has the ability to treat mild to moderate depression. It is an age old cure.
  • Ginger provides cleansing properties and provides a much needed energy boost during PMS.
  • Stinging Nettle a healthy blood herb used to support anemia during PMS and chronic fatigue.
  • Dandelion used remove exces hormones from the liver an reduce high estrogen levels.
  • Dandelion Leaf a diuretic, Dandelion Leaf can reduce the symptoms of bloating by eliminating excess water from the system. The leaf also contains natural potassium.
  • Valerian works as an antispasmodic, relieving menstrual cramps.

Types

A number of herbal teas might relieve symptoms of PMS, according to Victoria Zak in “20,000 Secrets of Tea.” The ones of note include dong quai tea, “cramp bark” or guelder rose, feverfew, chaste berry, skullcap and hops. These teas may alleviate various symptoms of PMS, including emotional and physical ones.

Teas for Physical Symptoms

Chaste berry and skullcap teas can balance hormones and relieve other physical symptoms, such as tension. They work well in a tea together. Feverfew eases headache pain and can start your menstruation flow if it needs a little assistance. Aptly nicknamed “cramp bark,” guelder rose is used to relieve premenstrual cramps. This tea eases pain, water retention and pressure in the body. Hops, which are known for their role in beer, ease physical symptoms by helping a woman sleep and reducing retained fluid in her body. These herbs can be purchased and steeped in boiling water to make tea, or they may be found in store-bought tea varieties.

Teas for Emotional Symptoms

Some of the teas that help physical symptoms can also alleviate emotional symptoms by regulating hormones and helping the woman sleep better, for instance. Specifically related to emotional symptoms, dong quai tea can brighten a down mood. It includes minerals zinc and calcium in its makeup, which help relieve depression. Valerian root helps with sleeping to make sure you get a good rest and can start the day with a positive outlook. Many women choose St. John’s Wort to improve mood, fight depression and help with everyday stress and tension. Hops may alleviate emotional symptoms such as anxiety and nervousness. These teas can also be used by steeping the herbs in water or buying them in stores.

Considerations

Although herbal teas can be beneficial for PMS, tea with caffeine can actually aggravate symptoms and cause premenstrual syndrome, so they should be avoided during this time. The caffeine can unbalance hormones, increase the chances a woman will have PMS and can cause iron and zinc to not be properly absorbed, according to McIntyre. It is best to choose herbal teas with no caffeine at this time.  Although tea may relieve PMS symptoms, a doctor should be consulted before using them. A doctor should be included in the decision to take herbal medicinal treatments and should be made aware of the entire scope of medicines and herbs on a person’s treatment plan.

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